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Need Solar power for HX 50

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May 15th, 2012 at 2:23pm  
Dear Mr.Eric

We need to run HX 50 with 2W Buc and LNB at remote site and we need to provide power by solar can you suggest what power of Solar panel and battery should be use and how can we calculate this .


Looking forward
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Eric Johnston
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Reply #1 - May 15th, 2012 at 5:27pm  
The specification: http://www.bentley-walker.com/objs/pdf/service8.pdf
says 90-264V AC at 50 or 60 Hz.
Or, with optional DC power supply, 12-24V DC.
I can't see any reference to current take on power consumed.

Please has anyone measured the AC mains current taken by an HX50 with 2W BUC ?

You need a magnetic loop meter clipped over one of the mains wires to make such a measurement.

I found a reference on the internet to the use of 205W solar panel and two 12V marine type batteries.
See: http://michiganemagine.org/?p=Satellite-System
 
Their pictures and text refer to the use of a Maximum Power Point Tracking charge controller from Blue Sky.
See: http://www.blueskyenergyinc.com/products/details/solar_boost_2512i/

Best regards, Eric.
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Reply #2 - May 15th, 2012 at 6:08pm  
What is the Hughes part number of the HX50 power brick Eric? Far as I know, Hughes only distributes at least 7 different power adapters worldwide. Each carries its specific power consumption figures, from which it should be very easy to calculate the power required to feed it with a solar panel system.

Five of those are limited to 1w transmitters. The other two are for 2w systems; the standard 64w, and the 80w (Tigris only). Unless there's yet another for the HX50, the solar system shouldn't need to provide more than 80W peak.

//greg//
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Eric Johnston
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Reply #3 - May 15th, 2012 at 6:20pm  
I don't know.  I've never seen one of these Hughes HX50 12 - 24V DC power supplies.

Hopefully someone will read this and say.

Maybe the people at http://michiganemagine.org/?p=Satellite-System  will be able to help.

Just a note of advice:  If you install things like power supply modules in outdoor boxes it helps to locate the box where it won't get extremely hot in the sun.  High temperatures reduce the reliability and lifetime of such equipment.

When I has an HX50 I wrote this:
"The mains AC power supply module has input intended for 100 - 240V 50-60Hz (2.0A max) and output of 6.5V 1.3 A and 19.5V 2.85 A."

Best regards, Eric.
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Reply #4 - May 15th, 2012 at 6:30pm  
No, I'm talking AC/DC power brick. I've never seen one of the DC power supplies either.

But that 2.85 amp is the number I was looking for. Assuming a 12v battery, I'd get one rated for a minimum 36AH. That should feed the HX50 for up to 12 hours in the absence of solar power. Then to determine which solar panel, I'd multiply the 2.85 amps by 19.5 volts (~56 watts).

So if I got my numbers right,  I'd say a minimum of a 60w solar panel feeding at least a 36AH 12v battery.

//greg//
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Reply #5 - May 16th, 2012 at 10:38am  
We need to run 64 Watt HX 50 with 2 W Buc and lnb, 110-240 Volt AC for 24 x 7 hours of Operation.

We have been suggested to use Mitsubishi 450-500 Wp Watt Solar Panel (Japan) with Trojan Battery GEL/AGM 450 Ah @ 24 Volt (USA

is this solution is enough or over powered.

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Reply #6 - May 16th, 2012 at 12:41pm  
Quote:
We need to run 64 Watt HX 50 with 2 W Buc and lnb, 110-240 Volt AC for 24 x 7 hours of Operation.

We have been suggested to use Mitsubishi 450-500 Wp Watt Solar Panel (Japan) with Trojan Battery GEL/AGM 450 Ah @ 24 Volt (USA

is this solution is enough or over powered.

That will give you plenty of extra power for devices other than the satellite, so I guess it comes down to your budget. What I listed above was based upon calculated minimum requirement for the satellite equipment only. It too was based upon the 64w requirement, but I used a 12v battery in the calculations.

If you're going to use the standard Hughes 64w AC/DC power adapter and battery power, you'll also need an inverter. The battery will be providing DC power, but ironically that particular power adapter requires AC input. Hence the inverter,  a small 150w model is more than sufficient (if limited to satellite-only use). It's an unfortunately redundant step, because the modem itself requires DC inputs. So your configuration will be solar panel(s) -> controller -> battery (DC) ->  inverter (DC/AC) ->   power adapter (AC/DC )-> modem (DC) -> LNB and transmitter (DC).

That's why Eric first mentioned the Hughes DC/DC power adapter. It eliminates the need for an inverter. But unfortunately neither of us knows  where to find the specs, much less the adapter itself. That said - if you find one - it will eliminate the inverter, and simplify the battery requirement. I suggest you contact your Hughes equipment provider regarding a DC/DC power adapter. If one can be provided, we'll revisit the question. If not, I'll rerun the calculations based upon the AC/DC adapter and a 24v battery.

//greg//
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Reply #7 - May 16th, 2012 at 2:52pm  
I suggest connecting a regular domestic kWHr meter to an HX50 system in normal use and noting how many kWHr is uses per month.

The 19V DC BUC current consumption is likely to vary according to whether the BUC is transmiting or not.  The percentage of time transmitting may be very low, like 1% of the time.

The number of Watt-Hours per day is the key input for the design of PV-battery systems

If a particular battery is proposed ask what daily depth of discharge (DOD) it is intended to provide, and expected lifetime of such batteries with that load.

Find out what is maximum input voltage the Hughes DC/DC converter can deal with. Nominally 24V batteries can reach peak 28.8V with some battery charge controllers.

Example calculations (very approximate):
Load 20W x 24 = 480 WHr/day
Load 30W x 24 = 720 WHr/day
Load 60W x 24 = 1440 WHr/day

Solar panel = WHr/day x 1.5  / 4
1.5 for losses, 4 for sun time hours per day, depends on location.

Battery = WHr/day x 1.6 x 5 / 24 = AHr rating for 24V battery with 20% normal DOD and 80% DOD exceptionally.
1.6 for losses, 5 for 20% DOD, 24 for volts.

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« Last Edit: May 17th, 2012 at 8:56am by Admin1 »  
 
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Reply #8 - May 17th, 2012 at 7:56am  
This is very useful.

Thanks Mr,Eric.

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