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telnet don't work

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Jul 6th, 2005 at 1:11pm  
Have problems trying telnet LinkStar modem from my Windows XP SR1 notebook.
MAC: 00.A0.94.01.3A.94 I suppose stand for 10.0.58.148
Cable is crossed and firewal disabled.
Ping to address generate time out and telnet give "unreachable host" error.
How to configure network adapter correctly?
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Reply #1 - Jul 8th, 2005 at 11:24am  
Hello, you can try with 10.1.58.148. Good luck!

Added by admin..

Older LinkStar boxes start up with the default IP address 10.0.aaa.bbb.   Recent ones are coming out with 10.1.aaa.bbb

See: http://www.satsig.net/images/linkstar-set-up-256.gif (40k)
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« Last Edit: Jul 12th, 2005 at 11:28am by Admin1 »  
 
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Reply #2 - Jul 11th, 2005 at 7:08pm  
You can also add a static arp entry on the PC for the mac address in question and then telnet to the IP which you assigned to the static arp entry.
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« Last Edit: Apr 30th, 2013 at 5:30pm by Admin1 »  
 
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Reply #3 - Apr 16th, 2007 at 6:35pm  
I too am unable to connect via telnet to my modem.  I need to connect to check my QPSKBER values while the system is up, so I can't use the default address.  Once the satellite LED is steady ON, I can "ping 10.93.93.1" with successful results, but "telnet 10.93.93.1" immediately comes back with "could not open connection to the host".  If I tried telnetting to
10.93.93.222 (222 is a bogus host I used for a sanity check) it comes back with the same after 20 seconds or so.  The IP address on the computer I'm trying to use to access is set to 10.93.93.44, so the subnet is the same.
Does the default gateway matter?  (mine is set to 10.93.93.1 which is the network ip address of the box) 
Does the port matter when you enter the telnet command?  I tried the static arp entry, but that did the same thing.  Anyone have any ideas?    The sat modem goes right into a network hub and my laptop is connected into that hub, so my pc can see it.
Any help is appreciated.
Thanks.
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Reply #4 - Apr 16th, 2007 at 7:20pm  
do you have any firewall on your laptop??..?
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Reply #5 - Apr 17th, 2007 at 7:40pm  
no, I turned off all firewalls on my PC.   There is an ethernet port inside of the case on the motherboard.  Can I plug into that from my PC with a regular ethernet cable?   

I'm thinking that our LNB might be bad.  The satellite meter says theres a signal even if you cover up the receiving cone and turn the dish way off of the satellite.  Another meter does the same thing like the LNB is giving a false raw signal to the meter, but the modem never gets a satellite light LED on.   Is there a way to test them?  Where would I get another one?

Thanks.
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Eric Johnston
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Reply #6 - Apr 18th, 2007 at 9:30am  
It is just a possibility - is the subnet mask correct ?

When your modem comes fully on-line and the gateway changes to its working IP address then at the same time it is possible that the subnet mask changes also, e.g. from 255.255.255.0 to 255.255.255.240, to match the number of IP addresses assigned for your LAN.

Ask the hub what range of IP addresses are valid for use in your LAN and what subnet mask to use.

If your subnet mask is 255.255.255.248 then you have 6 useable IP addresses, for example:
10.93.93.1 to 10.93.93.6
10.93.93.9 to 10.93.93.14
10.93.93.17 to 10.93.93.22
10.93.93.25 to 10.93.93.30
etc

If your subnet mask is 255.255.255.240 then you have 14 useable IP addresses for example:
10.93.93.1 to 10.93.93.14
10.93.93.17 to 10.93.93.30
etc

If your subnet mask is 255.255.255.224 then you have 30 useable IP addresses for example:
10.93.93.1 to 10.93.93.30
10.93.93.33 to 10.93.93.62
10.93.93.65 to 10.93.93.94
10.93.93.97 to 10.93.93.126
10.93.93.129 to 10.93.93.158
10.93.93.161 to 10.93.93.190
10.93.93.193 to 10.93.93.222
10.93.93.225 to 10.93.93.254

The gateway (the modem) is normally the first IP address in the useable range.  Set the IP address of your PCs within the remaining range and also set the subnet mask as told.

Note that the IP address immediately before the useable range is the ID or name of the network.
e.g. 10.93.93.128/27 This is the name you write on a network diagram line when you are referring to a network comprising useable IP addresses 10.93.93.129 to 10.93.93.158 with subnet mask 255.255.255.224
The 27 refers to the number of 1s in the mask and is an abbreviation of the full 255.255.255.224 which is the same as 11111111 11111111 11111111 1110000

See: http://www.subnet-calculator.com/ for more alternatives.
wxw
Note that the IP address immediately after the useable range is the Multicast address.

Regarding your LNB, on the 16th you say about the SAT LED was steady ON, so the LNB was OK.  On the 17th you say it never comes ON despite dish movement etc.  I would suspect a poor connection or DC supply problem.  Power off and check the F connectors.  The outer braid must make good connection.  The centre pins must stick out 2mm and slide smoothly into the sockets when connected.  There must be no short circuit between inner and outer.  Power on again after connecting up the cable at both ends.

The connector inside the case is not ethernet, but a serial port with a non-standard pin out.

Best regards, Eric.
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« Last Edit: Apr 24th, 2007 at 9:57am by Eric Johnston »  
 
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Reply #7 - Apr 22nd, 2007 at 2:46pm  
Ok, here's where I've gotten.  I got the IP information sheet from Bentley Walker.  I can use a crossover cable and telnet to the modem using the default ip address when we don't have a steady sat LED.  I need to check the QBSKBER so we can align the dish better (our BER is pretty bad), so we have a steady light now and trying to log on with the same cable and computer doesn't work.  I reset the IP address info on the PC according to the IP sheet they sent us, but not only can't it ping or connect to the modem, but it can't get on the internet anymore with those settings.  The subnet mask they said to use is 255.255.255.224, IP gateway 10.93.93.129 and host range from 130 to 158.  The settings we use now is 255.255.255.0, 10.93.93.1, and hosts start at 2 and go from there.   With the settings we use now, I can ping 10.93.93.1 but it can't connect right away when I telnet to it.    The DNS info is the same as what they say to use.  Is there some way BW can query our modem to find out the actual IP address it's on with a steady led?   With a satellite signal meter, it seemed like the dish was aligned the best that we could get it, but BW said the BER is still bad.    In internet explorer, if you type 10.93.93.1 in the address bar, we get a username/password prompt.  What the????

Anyone have any experience with this or have any other suggestions on how I can get into the thing?   
Unit morale is low with this internet thing not working great and the recent extension thing that came about.
Any help is appreciated...
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Reply #8 - Apr 22nd, 2007 at 5:09pm  
Where is the system located?
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Reply #9 - Apr 23rd, 2007 at 4:35pm  
system is located in the middle of Iraq.
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Reply #10 - Apr 23rd, 2007 at 11:26pm  
In case there has been a misunderstanding I have added many more examples of subnets in my previous posting above.  The two subnets starting with xxx.xxx.xxx.1 were only examples.  Subnets may start with other numbers, depending on which block out of the 0-255 range has been allocated.  Subnets actually consist of 4, 8, 16, 32 etc IP addresses, but the first and last IP addresses in each range are not for host PC use.

You say:
The subnet mask they said to use is 255.255.255.224, IP gateway 10.93.93.129 and host range from 130 to 158.  The settings we use now is 255.255.255.0, 10.93.93.1, and hosts start at 2 and go from there.

What happens if you use the details you have been told to use ?

Try with your test PC:
IP of the PC = 10.93.93.130 ( anywhere .130 to .158 )
Gateway of PC = 10.93.93.129
Subnet mask of PC = 255.255.255.224

You should be able to ping the gateway 10.93.93.129 and the internet.  You may well be able to ping other IP addresses like 10.93.93.1 (560 mS delay) which, if powered on and in service, are other LinkStar modems and customer PCs at other VSAT sites in the LinkStar network.  If the time delay is very short, like 3mS,  then 10.93.93.1 is close by and something is wrong. Tell BW.

Best regards, Eric.
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« Last Edit: Apr 24th, 2007 at 9:59am by Eric Johnston »  
 
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Reply #11 - Apr 24th, 2007 at 3:46pm  
Well, when I ping 10.93.93.1 it comes back with <1ms time, so it is close by and something is wrong.   When I
use the settings BW gives me, nothing works.

The modem goes into a wireless hub and then a big switch that goes to everyone.  Do I need to turn them off and back on when I change my settings so they take
effect?   

Does it matter if I'm using a PC through the switch or crossover cable direct to the modem?   (neither work though...)    BW said they used those settings (different DNS though) and said they logged onto the modem with them.  There must be something going on that's not right...
Sad
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Reply #12 - Apr 24th, 2007 at 5:08pm  
If you have only your test PC connected to the LinkStar modem and you have set your PC so its own ethernet port is an IP addresses different from 10.93.93.1 and you can ping 10.93.93.1 in 1mS then IP 10.93.93.1 is the LinkStar modem.

Check this again, as if your PC itself is 10.93.93.1 then you are just pinging yourself in 1 or 2 mS !  Your PC must have a different IP address from the LinkStar gateway.

The documentation from BW does not match the modem configuration.  Tell them and ask them to verify what you have been allocated.   The hub needs to be set up to match the documentation.   If you have been allocated 30 useable IP addresses then the subnet mask will be 255.255.255.224

Different VSAT sites will have been allocated different blocks out of the range 1 to 254, as previous post.
 
Don't worry about the rest of the network just yet.  Just connect the test PC direct to the modem with a cross-over cable.   As an alternative to a cross over cable use a passive hub, with nothing else connected.

You need a working DNS to access the internet or to use ping or tracert with text domain names.  You do not need DNS to do ping or tracert with IP addresses.

Best regards, Eric.
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Reply #13 - Apr 24th, 2007 at 10:53pm  
Currently my pc is hooked into the main switch.  When set to 10.93.93.44 (me) 255.255.255.0, & 10.93.93.1 for gateway I ping myself with 10000 bytes and it's <1ms.  I ping 10.93.93.1 with 10000 and it takes 4ms every time.  So .1 must be the modem?  A telnet to it just comes back with Could not open connection...:connect failed right away.    The results are the same when using a crossover cable with a different pc.   My firewall is disabled.   Is there something I need to reset or turn off and on after changing ip settings?  

Hold a sec, I just changed my pc settings to ip: 10.93.93.29, subnet: 255.255.255.224  gateway: 10.93.93.1    and then i telnet to 10.93.93.129 and I connected!   Figure that one out!   I can ping .1 and .129 both with 1000 bytes but .129 takes 2ms and .1 only takes 1ms.   Is it possible that the sat modem is actually .129 but someone on the net has their address set to .1?   That still doesn't explain why I can't connect with a crossover cable.   I'll have to play with it more.   This is bizarre.  At least I can check my settings.  My BER is .0009 or so.    I'm gonna try and adjust the polarization just a tad to see if that helps a little tomorrow before I try the dish because the bolts are kinda rusted and tight.   Maybe we can actually use the bandwidth we've been paying for all of this time for a change!   Smiley

Also, my RSUncorrectedErrorCount was like 5000 so I reset it with tcmreset.  Is it bad that it wasn't 0?  What makes it go up?   (It's steady a 0 now...)  Is RxPower any function of reception?

Thanks for all of the words of wisdom...
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Reply #14 - Apr 24th, 2007 at 11:37pm  
Have you tried mask 255.255.255.224, IP gateway 10.93.93.129 and host range from 130 to 158 ?   If you use the wrong mask you will get strange effects.

If you have a switch or hub in the middle you don't need a cross over cable.   The use of a cross over cable direct between your test PC and the modem is the recommended starting configuration as there is then nothing else connected to cause confusion.

Once you have one PC working well, make sure that all items on your modem LAN have different IP addresses and are all in the range .130 to .158 and all use same gateway and subnet mask.

Don't alter the polarisation unless you are talking to Bentley Walker at the same time and they are watching you transmit a CW test carrier while you make the adjustment.  The adjustment requires you get under the feed arm and turn the feed assembly by about 1 deg at time.  This is difficult.   There is a very sharp and deep cross-polar null.  When correct it makes a big reduction in interference caused to others.  You can't detect this null and set it up yourself by making small movements. You need their measurements and verbal help to guide you into the exact null; the null is only about 2 degrees wide.  Be patient and do it slowly as it takes quite a few seconds to make a measurement at the hub.

It is safe to make small adjustments of azimuth and elevation to see if the BER changes.  Make 4 measurements and average them as the baseline.  Write it down and mark the top flat on the nuts with white paint.  Turn the elevation nut 1/2 a turn and repeat the four BER measurements.  Continue turning  same way and repeat.  Then wind back to the exact centre.   Azimuth is more difficult as there is backlash and you need to approach the maximum from one side and stop just at the top.   Peaking up takes far longer than finding the satellite but is essential as the transmit beam is narrower than the receive beam.

Best regards, Eric.
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« Last Edit: Apr 25th, 2007 at 10:53am by Eric Johnston »  
 
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Reply #15 - Apr 26th, 2007 at 7:53pm  
The way we have it set up now, the RCST goes into a small wireless hub.  From there it goes (via cables) into one PC and then into a 40 port switch.  Everybody else is hooked into the switch.  It could be that we've all been using other ip addresses not in the range given by BW because they're local IP addresses from the switch, when according to BW, we're really only using like 3 IP addresses: one for the RCST, one for the first PC, and one for the switch?  Would this have any effect on our relative speed?   Should I take the wireless hub out of the system?

Using the BER as a guide as you mentioned, made some small adjustments on just the AZ & EL.  We got the BER down to .0006 to .0008 most of the time.  Didn't mess with the polarization per your suggestion.    Is there a linkstar command to see the packets that are dropping?   Is there a command to see how much bandwidth we are using?  What does RSUncorrectedErrorCount  mean and is it bad if it's not zero? 

How is BER related to speed?   Basically, when it's slow, how can I tell if the bandwidth is maxed out, the BER is high, or something else is going on? 

Thanks.
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Reply #16 - Apr 26th, 2007 at 10:26pm  
LinkStar:  While you have the raw BER showing 0.0006 to 0.0008 then there should be virtually no errors at all after error correction, and so no effect on your traffic.  The uncorrected error count will increase occasionally, typically when there is some obstruction of the satellite beam or very heavy rain or an interference click.  I hope someone else will say how to measure traffic within the LinkStar RCST.

It may be possible to get into the Wireless device and measure the traffic flow there.  Does the wireless device have a web type interface where you can monitor and configure its operation ?  

Is the wireless device a wireless router ?  If so, it will be able to provide a new set of private IP addresses allocatable for your LAN.  What is the name/model of the wireless device ?  If it is a router then your PC will have your choice of LAN IP address, subnet mask and the gateway should be the wireless router.  

All previous advice regarding IP addresses applies if you use the standard test configuration of just a cross over cable alone to connect direct from a PC to the LinkStar (or two straight cables via passive hub).

Having a router is the only way of attaching more than 29 devices (based on your buying a 224 mask).

You don't say how many PCs you have connected but you may have a congestion problem.  Divide your monthly payment tariff by $70 and that will give the approx number of PCs you can reasonably connect.  Even so you must stop all viruses and discourage massive downloads/uploads to prevent congestion.  A Guardianbox would allow you to manage your traffic.
wxw
Best regards, Eric.
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