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How important is insurance for repairs

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Ex Member
Ex Member


Jun 19th, 2010 at 12:44am  
I just signed up for HughesNet satellite internet.  We just moved into a remote secluded home near Greenville, SC.  After calling AT&T (local land line but not even DSL on our road, just dialup), Charter (no cable TV/internet on our road), and DirecTV, WildBlue, and just about every other provider I could think of, HughesNet was all there was.

That's not a problem under the circumstances.  But I do have a question:  we live in an area vulnerable to thunderstorms and lightning.  If we have a hit, how vulnerable is the equipment to damage?  How expensive would repairs or replacements be?

I've been offered a monthly "insurance plan" for such damage for our DirecTV dish and receivers, for our TV service.  My wife thinks the HughesNet guy said we'd be smart to get a plan like that for the Hughes equipment too.

I'll make my own decision about how much risk to accept, but I'd like it to be an informed decision taking into account the likely financial aspects too.

Any thoughts, anyone?
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Reply #1 - Jun 19th, 2010 at 4:35am  
A competently grounded HughesNet system and a surge protecting UPS should provide more than adequate protection. If your Hughes guy thinks you need insurance (unless he sells insurance on the side too), I'd be suspicious of his professional qualifications. Relative to effective grounding anyway.

//greg//
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Reply #2 - Jun 20th, 2010 at 12:04am  
Thanks.  I saw the ground wire.  It is "competently grounded" IMO.  But I have no surge protection or UPS at all.  So am I half protected?

I'm still curious about the approx. $ of replacing or repairing seriously damaged eqpt.  Any thoughts on that one?

Tom
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Reply #3 - Jun 20th, 2010 at 4:30am  
Well, "seeing" a ground wire means very little. A competently grounded system consists of a minimum of four grounds:
1. transmitter to mast or pole (DC)
2. mast or pole (DC)
3. coaxial cable grounding block (DC)
4. modem (AC)
And items 2/3/4 must be tied into the structure common ground, typically located below the electrical service entrance (meter).

Used/reconditioned TRIAs (Transmit/Receive Integrated Assembly) start around $100. New ones cost 2-3 times that. Montana Satellite is a reliable source. Replacement modems can be obtained right from Hughes, usually at no cost during the warranty period. After that - or when they determine the fault isn't covered by warranty - there are plenty of used ones on eBay and Craigs List

By the way, most UPS manufacturers provide free hardware insurance. Any time any equipment plugged into their product is damaged/destroyed by an electrical anomaly, they usually compensate for repair/replacement.

//greg//
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