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The Best LNB for Sat Internet

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kozmonaut
Ex Member


Sep 17th, 2008 at 4:24am  
So I figure on to my other post that I am going to build my own sat internet setup and just lease the BW directly.

What type of KU/KA LNB do sat internet companies use, I heard the higher the MGZ the better, I know LNBS when it comes to Sat TV, but all the pictures I see of SAT internet, the lnbs look allot different.

SO basicly my setup would be this

36 inch dish
KU/KA LNB
Wireless network router (for multiable connections)
Sat Internet Modem
Laptop
PCMIA wireless network cards for each laptop connected to the network
coax cable

is there anything else i would need? I know say WILDBLUE functions on ANIK-F2 or so. I'll have to comparably shop around for companies that either wholesale Bandwidth packages or so on.

MY major questions on this

What type of SAT LNB is the best, if i want to bulk order them to setup a ton of small biz in my remote area. Does the LNB have any special outlets for WI-FI or Ethernet connectors?

Do you need a Satelite Modem? or is a router good enough?

THanks

KOz
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USN - Retired
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Reply #1 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 5:04am  
Judging by your questions, I believe you may be biting off more than you can chew. This is not exactly a do-it-yourself job for the novice. Setting up a two-way satellite internet circuit - then networking it - isn't anything like throwing up a dish to catch a TV signal. And you can work KA - or you can work KU. But not both at the same time.

You also don't seem to realize that a transmitter (BUC) is involved. And the BUC and LNB connect with the modem via IFL (typically L-band over coax). Any Ethernet connectivity would be on the DC side of the modem. Some modems have DHCP capability, but few have routing - or even hub - features.

No offense, but you might want to either buy a pre-configured system - or simply have one built to your specifications.

//greg//
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kozmonaut
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Reply #2 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 5:17am  
Well isnt it just possible to have all the equipment and just lease the network from another companies central hub?

Can you point me to a tutorial on the transmitter? I have been reading the installer cirtification from wildblue, and it seems all the technology is preety basic, aim the dish with a birddog to anik-f2 to their frequency range and its all good, right? If we were to lease time from another company, aiming the dish and hitting the bird is preety easy, and all of the outgoing/incomming would bounce off of a satelite and go through their data center hub right?
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scooterz56
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Reply #3 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 12:55pm  
You need a APA and  regular satellite meter to aim a wildblue system not a birddog.

Sure you can lease bandwidth on a satellite, got about 20K a month to spare?

Like Greg says, you need to look at the systems that are currently available and go from there.


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Reply #4 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 2:14pm  
I just looked at the OP question.  My answer: The best LNB for Sat internet is the Invacom SPV range, see details Invacom LNB.   If you want a Ku band TRIA try these: Ku band TRIA: BUC/LNB for sale   They have multiple switchable LNB LO frequencies (9.75, 10, 10.60 and 11.3 GHz) and are switchable between co-pol or cross pol mode.

If you really want to do your own thing and are in the far east part of Canada then we may be able to lease you capacity on NSS7 at around $7000 per month for 800k down and 200k up.  See http://www.satsig.net/global-teleports/vipersat-america-coverage-beams.htm   You will need to buy your own teleport dish and hub equipment unless you use ours.  Put 50 PCs all at one site or 10 PCs at each of 5 sites.  VoIP service and VoIP phones available and they work very well.

Your best plan is to try something like Wildblue/Xplornet or HughesNet (was called Direcway) and get some experience.  iDirect and LinkStar are alternatives if you are seeking a more personalised and small-company experience.

Best regards, Eric.
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« Last Edit: Nov 17th, 2014 at 9:55am by Admin1 »  
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USN - Retired
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Reply #5 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 2:43pm  
Quote:
Well isnt it just possible to have all the equipment and just lease the network from another companies central hub?

You don't have the big picture here. A satellite is little more than an orbiting radio relay. All it does is bounce your radio signal to and from another earth terminal. To do that, you'd lease transponder space on a satellite with which your equipment is compatible. But that only gets your signal back to earth. From there, the distant earth terminal has to hand off your signal to an internet provider (networking facility). So - not including your one time hardware purchase price - you're looking at two recurring bills here; one for satellite access, another for network time. A pre-configured package provides both on one bill (and some subsidize the up front hardware cost as well).

But the Wildblue/XploreNet equipment you cite is proprietary. It won't work with any other provider. Those folks just sell pre-configured packages. Besides, that equipment is Ka-band - and there are comparatively few Ka-band satellites over which to pass an internet connection (I can only think of 4 with North American footprints right now). And as two of us have told you now, it's not like grabbing a TV signal outa the ether. Special knowledge and (again) proprietary pointing aids are required to do it correctly (and legally). Only installers that have received training certification from these proprietary systems are authorized to install them. Circumventing that little detail could even result in the provider denying service to the offending connection.

You could however, buy a Wildblue or (depending on your location) XploreNet system - have it professionally installed - and use THEIR network. Be advised though, less than satisfied customer feedback makes it clear that neither VoIP nor VPN are very viable through Wildblue. XploreNet on the other hand seems to have gone to greater pains to acommodate the VoIP requirement. Understand that the standard WB dish is quite a bit smaller than your specified 36". If you elect to go this route in the higher latitudes, specify your need for their optional 1.2m system. With HughesNet on the other hand, I believe up to 1.8m (Ku-band) systems to be more readily available

//greg//
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« Last Edit: Nov 17th, 2014 at 10:00am by Admin1 »  
 
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kozmonaut
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Reply #6 - Sep 17th, 2008 at 7:53pm  
Thank you both for taking the time to address my questions and concerns.

I am now familer with the type of equipmnent is nessicary.

I was thinking of maybe just doing business with wildblue or explorenet, but i heard wildblue experiences rain fade allot, and We do live in British Columbia which preety well is a terential rain forest.

Prehapes it might be better for us to purchase our own equipment, get cirtified training from those companies, do our own installs, and then just lease the time directly from there with a small mark up.

I talked to both of these companies on the phone and they told me that they do not do wholesale deals, so if we wanted to charge other people for the service, using say wildblue as our provider, we might be able to get cheaper equipment wholesale then they use, but for the lease time for the satelite, we would not be able to mark it up, to only stay competitive, therefore making installing and the equipment as the only form to make a little bit of profit.

Has anyone here been a distributer for these companies, do they give deals on equipment on lease time to their offical distributers? Is there anual fees to do so? Like i said, i talked to them on the phone, but they were a little bit not fourth comming about this sort of thing.

I guess, because we want to set our own camp up, then start setting up and doing business with other companies in our area, being a offical distributer with our own installers cirtified by these companies might be the only way to go for a start up, then eventually, start our own IP, lease arrays and stuff from a satelite, and sell our own BW.

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